San Diego Master Gardener Seminar

San Diego Master Gardener Seminar

Tomorrow is the launch of the San Diego Master Gardeners’ virtual seminar. This event is packed full of 13 great speakers and 3 fun workshops, sixteen presentations in all. The beauty of this seminar, being virtual, is that you’ll be able to watch all the presentations at your leisure over a full week, starting tomorrow at 9:00am PST. AND it’s only $35!!!

South American Palm Weevil

South American Palm Weevil

If you haven’t seen the devastating effects of this vicious little bug, you’ll know it when you see it. It’s destroying our beautiful, iconic Canary Island Date Palms at alarming numbers. In a matter of 5 years when the first infected palm was discovered hundreds of palms have been infected and killed by this weevil.

These trees take years to reach the heights that make them so beautiful and impressive. It’s scary to think that we could lose all these palms and the next generations won’t have these giant palms to admire.

More info:
https://cisr.ucr.edu/invasive-species/south-american-palm-weevil

Roses and caterpillars

Roses and caterpillars

It’s so disheartening to find a favorite rose plant munched badly by pests.  This time of year caterpillars of all sizes are out in force and laying waste to a lot of the hard work we do in our gardens. 

Master Gardener Rita Perwich, another Coronado gardener wrote a great article in the San Diego Union Tribune about caterpillars and how to keep them under control.  Rita is a Master Rosarian and really knows everything about roses.  Her article is a great read:  

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/lifestyle/home-and-garden/story/2020-08-01/caterpillars-are-eyecatching-but-their-eating-habits-arent-not-so-darling

 

New Rose Starts

New Rose Starts

I’m not much into roses but I have a few climbers in my yard.  One is a pretty pink climber hanging over an arbor in my yard. I first saw this variety in Texas a few years ago. We were driving through a neighborhood and I spotted it. I got out to take pictures and was greeted by the plant’s owner. He told me the story that it was named after a woman named Peggy Martin.  She had lived through Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. A few weeks after the hurricane, she was allowed to go back to her home which has been completely underwater for days.  When she got there everything was destroyed, but this rose was climbing out of the middle of the rubble, strong and apparently unfazed by all the mess.

I was telling my friend, Chris, about this rose and he knew the story, too. Turns out he had this variety growing in his yard and gave me a cutting he had propagated. It really took off when I planted it. This climber densely blooms along the length of the branches with brilliant pink flowers.  Even better, this rose has no thorns!  If there’s a downside, it would be that the flowers have no scent.  Two out of three is fine!

I planted my cutting in a location that doesn’t have room to showcase this beauty in its full blooming glory and I’ve decided that I’m going to place this beauty next to my Cecile Brunner in the alley. The different shades of pink will complement each other, one will have a nice smell and one will be spectacular in bloom.

I waited until the last bloom cycle was over and took cuttings of new growth.  To start perfect new rose clones, cut below first leaf set below the flower, count down 4 more leaf seats, cut, remove bottom two leaf sets, stick cane 1/2 way into dirt.  I’ve got three in process.  Now we wait!

I’m not sure if this one is going to make it.

But this one has fresh growth starting to peek out!