Miscellaneous Monday 12-10-18

I’m starting to get in the holiday spirit.  Cold weather and some rain has been great!

Agroforestry – growing crops under trees

Taking hardwood cuttings: a tutorial

Fresh vs. Fake:  What kind of tree are you getting for Christmas?

I’m a bit of a birdwatcher.  Here’s a site with bird info: All About Birds

A lovely start to your week. Louie Schwartzberg: Nature. Beauty.Gratitude.

Caterpallor (n.): The color you turn after finding half a worm in the fruit you’re eating.

Happy Monday and have a nice week!

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Miscellaneous Monday 12-03-18

Who needs a greenhouse?  Here’s a catalog called The Green House Catalog

I have never been very successful with African Violets, but I do love them.  Here’s a growing guide – maybe there’s hope for me!

There are a lot of options available for ground covers: Stepables – plants that tolerate foot traffic.

Here’s a fun idea for gifts:  Chalk painted pots

Here’s some Monday beauty for you:  The Giant Sequoia – impressive in size and beautiful

Happy Monday!!!

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Tuesday Trees – Apfeln

Or Apples for you non-German speakers.   Twenty five years ago Mi Esposo got orders to Stuttgart, Germany and we moved there with two small boys right before winter set in.   I remember eating fresh, crisp apples at our twice-a-week outdoor market while the kids ate their hot, soft pretzels – good times!   This time of year always takes me back to those great years and simpler times.

So, to get back to our Tuesday Trees, I am excited to say that I am harvesting apples now from my Fuji tree.   I was in the garden yesterday morning and ate an apple right off the tree.  The shine comes from a little buffing on my t-shirt.  It was so juicy I was not a very neat eater!

You, too, can grow apples, even on the coast.  Coastal areas have 100-300 chill hours so it’s very important to make sure to choose a variety that is low-chill or you’ll never get fruit.   If I were to do it again, I would probably plant all Fujis.  The taste and crispness are perfect for me.  I don’t have a lot of room on my property so I planted my tree on the fence and am keeping it  trimmed to espalier.  At least that’s what I’m trying to do, but I’m not doing a very tidy job of it.   Despite my learning curve, the tree is thriving and I’m getting apples so all is not lost.

The  apple (Malus domestica) is a member of Rosaceae, the rose family.  January through March is the ideal time to plant apples in their bare-root stage.   Plant where they will get good good drainage and full sun.  Nitrogen and zinc are two of the most important nutrients to supply apple trees. Fertilizing twice per year, once in the spring and again in the fall, will keep your apple tree vigorous.  Glückliche Gartenarbeit!

 

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Succulent Propagation Technique

I have a lot of succulents and I’m always happy to share, but I haven’t always been as successful as I would like when it comes to propagating new plants. Succulents are pretty easy to root but it helps to have a little info to work from.

I was discussing this with a friend who is very knowledgeable about succulents and she gave me a photo-copied sheet of different cutting points on a succulent stem. I wish I could give attribution to this great guideline to follow for cutting succulents for propagation but I was unsuccessful in finding the source.  Anyway, I realize now that I have been cutting too long a stem and will change my propagation technique to get better results.  Here’s a picture with information below it that I have created FYI.

A – Cutting this high on the stem is known as “pinching out.” The reason to pinch this high on the plant stem is to create growth for multiple cuttings or have the plants develop into a multi-headed plant. Cutting this high will force side stems to grow that will be viable cuttings themselves once they’ve grown out. The top part that is cut off is not a viable cutting and will not root so just throw it away.

B – Cutting here is optimal for creating a new plant from the top part and forcing new shoots to grow off the stem. This method works best if a few leaves are left on the stem, allowing it to recover more efficiently, producing the most new stems.

C – Cutting at this mark is officially called deadheading. A cut made here will result in a plant that will root easily. The stem most likely won’t develop any shoots and can slowly wither down.

D – Cutting lower on the stem creates a longer stem, but takes much longer to establish roots. The lower stem might produce a few shoots, but can also wither down.

E – Cutting further down the stem is not recommended because the head will have to work hard to get established and the lower stem is likely to die.

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November in the Garden

I like this time of year because it signals the start of my winter vegetable garden.  Yay!  

The November Garden Task list has been posted for your perusal: November in the Garden

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